As part of our mission statement, the Toronto Chapter organizes three series of lectures each year to correspond with the Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters. Most events are free and open to the public, and they represent Egyptological scholarship worldwide.

In order to keep all our members safe during these uncertain times, all Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 lectures will be hosted through the Zoom platform. A Zoom registration link will be provided under the appropriate lecture and once you register you will receive an email from the SSEA Toronto Chapter with the meeting link to join on the day of the lecture.

Please note our Annual Meeting of Ontario Members will be held on November 5, 2021 at 7 pm.

Fall 2021

Lecture – Taste the diversity: egypt (FINished)

  • Who? Chef Amr Elimam (Papyrus Restaurant, Toronto)
  • When? Thursday, September 23, 2021 at 7 pm (EST)
  • Where? Zoom Lecture
  • Registration Link: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/egyptian-cooking-with-amr-tickets-170158006177
  • Abstract: We invite you to watch “Taste the Diversity-Egypt” featuring Amr Elimam, cooking in his Egyptian restaurant, Papyrus. Afterwards, Amr will answer any questions you may have. Amr Elimam is the owner of Papyrus; an Egyptian restaurant located in Toronto. Amr started out with his Mechanical Engineering degree from the American University in Cairo. He has worked in Consumer Packaged Goods Manufacturing, Management Consulting and Banking. He opened the restaurant Papyrus as a “cultural project”.  Recently, ECG Productions collaborated with Amr producing and filming “Taste the Diversity-Egypt” featuring Amr’s cooking in the context of Egypt’s rich culinary history.  You can find more information on the ECG Productions website: https://ecgproductions.ca/.
Papyrus
337 Danforth Avenue
Toronto, ON
M4K 1N7
647 352 3878
https://papyrusfood.ca/

Lecture – A newly found tomb of Intef, Great General of the Army, at Lisht (part of the 50th anniversary lecture series) (finished)

  • Who? Dr. Greg Mumford
  • When? Thursday, October 28, 2021 at 7 pm (EST)
  • Where? Zoom Lecture
  • Registration Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0ucu6spj4sHdQZxXJnYfnD-VpMX8SM5lqo
  • Abstract: The joint MoA and UAB/GlobalXplorer project at Lisht (co-directed by S. Parcak, M. Yousef, and A. Okasha) continued investigating the tomb of a Great Overseer of the Army, Intef in the 2016-17 seasons. This project explored the rock-cut main hall, entryway, eastern mudbrick causeway and an affiliated structure (monumental façade?) fronting the terraced, bedrock plateau edge; we also investigated part of the mudbrick entry complex for a tomb to the immediate south of Intef’s causeway. The debris layers and floor in Intef’s hall and entryway revealed several phases in ancient to modern disturbance and looting, at least two separate periods in cutting rock-cut shafts for burial chambers in the hall and entryway, and numerous architectural fragments, artifacts, and human remains from the tomb and later periods of activity. The poor quality bedrock had necessitated the addition of stone wall slabs with inscriptions and scenes to embellish Intef’s central offering chamber, a northern chamber (for a false door), and the bedrock face fronting these chambers, including an elaborate built-up entryway to the central chamber. The hall’s southwest side contained traces of a tall niche, while a small, rock-cut niche lay above the floor in the hall’s southeast corner. Some inset square pillar bases with incised guidelines indicated that the hall had originally held four pillars, while a rock-cut door pivot socket suggested a wooden door lay within a built-up stone door frame dividing the hall from the entryway. Part of the hall contained stone paving, while the entry had mudbrick paving.
  • About the Speaker: Although Greg was born in Canada (1965), he grew up in Nairobi, Kenya (1965-1976), Niagara Falls, Canada (1976-77), and Pretoria, South Africa (1977-1980), during which he accompanied his parents on frequent trips to archaeological sites, museums, and public lectures in these and other countries (e.g., Ethiopia; Tanzania; Uganda). Upon returning to Canada, he completed his schooling in Vancouver (1980-1983), and then went to the University of Toronto where he pursued a long-held childhood dream to become both an archaeologist and an Egyptologist. During his studies he expanded his interests to study both ancient Egypt and its neighbours (including Nubia, the Aegean, Anatolia, Syria-Palestine, and Mesopotamia) and began focusing upon international relations between these regions from Prehistory through the Pharaonic period (5,000-332 BCE). His other academic and related interests include architecture/drafting and the medieval period (particularly the Vikings), two career options that he considered seriously, but has maintained mainly as side interests (e.g., he incorporate them into some courses and archaeological projects). He has participated in a broad range of archaeological excavations and surveys from 1985 to the present, including in British Columbia (Canada), Newfoundland (Canada), Alabama (U.S.A.), and multiple sites and regions throughout Egypt: he directs projects at Tell Tebilla (NE Delta) and Markha Plain (SW Sinai) in Egypt; he has participated variously in prehistoric through Roman-Coptic period projects at East Karnak (Luxor), Tomb of Merenptah (Valley of the Kings), Amarna and its vicinity (Middle Egypt), Dakhleh Oasis (Western Desert), Mendes (NE Delta), Tell Kedwa/Qedwa (NW Sinai), and Tell Borg (NW Sinai). He has taught a number of courses at Wilfrid Laurier University (1995), UCLA (1999-2000), the University of Toronto (periodic teaching from 1999-2005), and the University of Wales Swansea (2005-2006), and he is now based –as an associate professor– at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (2006/7-present). He also works frequently with his spouse, Dr. S. Parcak, on several joint projects, including co-directing a few archaeological projects (e.g., Point Rosee, NL), and assisting on others (e.g., el-Lisht, Egypt [i.e., as a co-director/field director with lead directors: S. Parcak and M. Youssef; A. Okasha]). 

lecture – The SSEA: Its Infant and Adolescent Years (part of the 50th anniversary lecture series)(finished)

  • Who? Dr. Terry Miosi
  • When? Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 7 pm (EST)
  • Where? Zoom Lecture
  • Registration Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUocuyhqTsuE9b8iUpv1N1f1UxSGFadHW-e
  • Abstract: Geoff Freemen, Ron Williams, Nick Millet, Winifred Needler, Faith Stanley, Peter Wysocki, Edward Habib, and many more – over the 50-plus years of the SSEA’s existence we have lost many of the people who were there at – or almost at – the beginning, with the most recent being Sally Katary.  We deeply miss them all. But there are a few of us around that are still sound enough of body and mind to remember a good deal of what, when and why things took place that started the SSEA and shaped where it is today. Terry Miosi, one of the triumvirate who crossed hands over a kitchen table one evening in agreement to start all of this, will give a highly informal discussion of what the SSEA’s first decade was like.  Since everyone attending will be a lover of things Egyptian, there ought to be no difficulty with realizing that Miosi’s version of some of the events – much like Ramses II’s version of the Battle of Kadesh – might be more accurately classified as myth or legend than historical fact. To help sort fact from fiction, his intention is to invite, cajole and even beg a few of the key people from those formative years into joining the discussion and adding their particular memories of some of the more special events that took place “back in the day”.
  • About the Speaker: Terry Miosi received his Ph.D. in Ancient Near Easter Studies from the University of Toronto specializing in Egyptian Language and Religion and Coptic Studies.  With Geoffrey Freeman and Professor Donald Redford, he was one of the founders of the SSEA, and served on its Board of Directors as Treasurer, Education programs chair, and Canadian Mediterranean Institute representative through much of the SSEA’s first twenty years. Upon receiving his Ph.D., he immediately moved into academic administration, serving, for example, as: Director of Liberal Studies programs at the UofT’s School of Continuing Studies; Deputy Superintendent of the Private Career Colleges division of Ontario’s Ministry of Education and Training; and Senior Policy Advisor and Acting Director of the Ontario’s Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board. Upon his retirement from government work, he served as Senior Consultant to the Qualifications Framework Project of the United Arab Emirates, and has consulted with numerous universities and colleges in Canada, the Middle East, and the U.S.A. on institutional accreditation and quality issues. In 2012, he was awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for contributions to higher education and training in Canada. He is the author of numerous articles and monographs on Ancient Egypt, early Christianity, and higher education, with his article on the Sokar Boat to appear in the forthcoming publication of the SSEA’s work at the Osiris Ruler of Eternity temple at Karnak.

there will be no lecture in decembeR

Spring 2022

LectureSecrets of the Sacred Baboons (finished)

  • Who? Dr. Nathaniel Dominy (Dartmouth College, NH)
  • When? January 20, 2022 at 7 pm (EST)
  • Where? Zoom Lecture (this may be in person)
  • Registration Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYudumpqz0oGtYlCAlNuxMG1OT6ifu1Wkh0
  • Abstract: Punt was God’s Land in the Egyptian worldview. It was reached by land or sea and located south and east of Egypt, suggesting a position in the southern Red Sea region, either in Africa or Arabia. Maritime trade between Egypt and Punt spanned some 1200 years, and many scholars view it as the first long-distance leg of the Spice Route. Others describe the Egypt-Punt trading relationship as the beginning of economic globalization. Punt is therefore a port and kingdom of considerable historical importance, but its location is uncertain and the subject of enduring debate. This talk will focus on the bones and teeth of mummified baboons recovered from New Kingdom temples and Ptolemaic tombs. The isotope composition of these tissues is a valuable source of information about the life and lifeways of an animal. In some cases, our evidence points to captive breeding and a lifetime spent in Egypt. In other cases, we find evidence of importation from faraway lands. So far, this evidence corroborates the consensus view on the location of Punt, putting it in the modern-day countries of Eritrea and northern Somalia.
  • About the Speaker: Dr. Nathaniel Dominy is the Charles Hansen Professor of Anthropology and Biological Sciences at Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH). His research is focused on the ecology and evolution of nonhuman primates, especially their foraging behaviours and adaptations. Most of his fieldwork occurs in tropical Africa and southeast Asia, but he has a special fondness for Egypt and the cultural importance of monkeys in antiquity.

Lecture – agents of punishment in the new kingdom netherworld books (Finished)

  • Who?  Dr. Hamada Hussein (University of Sadat City, Egypt)
  • When? Saturday, February 26, 2022 at 12 pm (EST)  
  • Where? Zoom
  • Registration Link:  https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUuceyqrDspE9Ocee9aDFF_uq8NVqqfEC2-
  • Abstract: This lecture focuses on the punishment agents in four New Kingdom Netherworld Books: the Book of the Amduat, the Book of Gates, the Book of Caverns and the Book of Earth. Although these Netherworld guides have been translated and commented on at length, there has not to date been a systematic and comprehensive study of all the beings inhabiting the Egyptian Netherworld as portrayed in these compositions. Through a textual analysis, complemented with references to the iconography of the underworld, a comprehensive analysis of the punishment agents is introduced. The categorisations of these punitive beings into groups according to the god for whom they executed punishment reveals that their epithets relate strongly to the myths of either Re or Osiris. The nomenclature of these beings reveals that some figures appeared for the first time, (and perhaps were only ever attested) in the New Kingdom Netherworld Books. Further analysis also reveals that these epithets do not form a single category. Rather, these epithets range from phases expressing the manifestations of Re and the Solar-Osirian unity, to mere functional epithets describing their immediate punitive function in the Egyptian Netherworld. The examination of the place of the studied beings from the Egyptian ‘pantheon’ reveals that they were gods (nTrw), rather than demons, and they were subordinate to the great god (nTr-aA) Re. The analysis of the potential interaction between the living and these punitive Netherworld beings through the theophoric names and the attestations of the epithets at temples, it can be concluded that the living had little interaction with them. 
  • About the Speaker: Hamada obtained his PhD from the University of Liverpool in 2019. His research focuses on the ancient Egyptian religion with a special focus on the New Kingdom Netherworld Books. He worked at the University of Sadat City as a teaching assistant from 2009 to 2015. During that time, he taught tourism guidance students a number of course including art, religion, and history of Pharaonic and Graeco-Roman Egypt. Upon receiving his PhD, he started working at the University of Sadat City, Egypt, as a lecturer in Egyptology. He currently teaches literature, religion and archaeology of ancient Egypt. 

Lecture – Imperial pageantry in the reign of tutankhamun (lecture in honour of the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the tomb of King Tutankhamun) (finished)

  • Who?  Carla G. Mesa Guzzo (University of Toronto, PhD student)
  • When? March 31, 2022 at 7 pm (EST)
  • Where? Zoom
  • Registration Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUucuGqrjooG9y74w0L4NHeesiyXzV0OZ71
  • Abstract: This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb. This intact royal tomb has provided us with a wealth of evidence regarding many aspects of ancient Egyptian kingship. Items found within, such as the famous painted chest depicting scenes of warfare and hunting as well as rare examples of chariots shed light on the martial roles of the king and New Kingdom imperialist ideology at large. While Amarna and Post-Amarna kings did use military force to maintain their empire, display was perhaps an equally important tool in preserving imperial hegemony and enacting royal power. This talk will explore some of the ways in which Tutankhamun, working within a tradition already well established by Akhenaten, may have employed martial pageantry to such an effect. While the New Kingdom pharaohs more generally did undoubtedly engage in display on battlefields abroad, this talk will focus on military display within Egypt. Given the potentially wide use of imperialist and martial imagery in ostensibly non-martial settings, this talk will narrow its focus to those displays employing movement, and especially those which made use of chariots.
  • About the Speaker: Carla G. Mesa Guzzo is a PhD candidate and Course Instructor at the Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations Department in the University of Toronto. Her doctoral thesis investigates royal military pageantry in the Amarna and Post-Amarna periods against the backdrop of New Kingdom imperialism. 

Lecture – Celebrating the Bicentennial of the Decipherment of the Rosetta Stone : Jean-François Champollion and the Dawn of Egyptology (Lecture in honour of the 200th anniversary of the decipherment of hieroglyphs) (finished)

  • Who? Dr. Jean Revez (Université du Québec à Montréal)
  • When? April 14, 2022 at 7 pm (EST)
  • Where? Zoom
  • Registration Link:  https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZclcumtqzMiE9W7NpxG5c7Bnc1lGW2sdbQe
  • Abstract: On the 27th of September 1822, Jean-François Champollion, the gifted French scholar who had spent years working on the decipherment of the ancient Egyptian scripts, exposed his main conclusions regarding the reading of the hieroglyphs in front of a prestigious crowd gathered at the Académie des Inscriptions et des Belles-Lettres in Paris. The summary of his theses in his now famous Lettre à M. Dacier published the same year is widely regarded as a crucial milestone in our enhanced understanding of Pharaonic Civilization. What was the state of the knowledge of Egyptian hieroglyphs in the times leading to 1822 ? Who were the others scientists who paved the way for Champollion ? What was the political and cultural backdrop during those heady days? What is Champollion’s main heritage to the discipline of Egyptology? These are some of the issues that will be dealt with in the course of this lecture.
  • About the Speaker: Dr. Jean Revez is professor at the History Department of the University of Quebec in Montréal (UQÀM). He has a B.A. in liberal arts and pursued graduate studies in Egyptology at the University of Heidelberg, and completed his Ph.D. at the University of Paris-Sorbonne. He has worked extensively in Egypt, most notably at Karnak, where he joined the permanent French mission of the CNRS, as well as excavation teams from the University of Toronto. He is currently the co-director of the joint UQÀM-University of Memphis epigraphic mission at Karnak. Professor Revez’s research interests cover kingship and royal ideology, Nubian’s cultural inheritance of Egyptian Civilization, as well as new approaches to computerized methods of epigraphic survey of Egyptian monuments.

LECTURE – Royal and Divine Motifs in Foreign Lands: Egyptian Iconography in Western Asia

  • Who? Chana Algarvio
  • When? May 19, 2022 at 7:00 pm (EDT)
  • Where? Zoom
  • Registration Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYoce-srzgiG9HSAkEhvvUtgT1EKRwLgD7Y
  • Abstract: Since the second millennium BCE with the expansion of Egyptian control in foreign lands, various cultures across western Asia assimilated Egyptian symbols and motifs within the repertoire of local iconography to serve local contexts and needs—particularly in regards to kingship and religion. Beginning with the Middle Bronze Age and up to the advent of the spread of Hellenism by Alexander the Great in the 4th century BCE, a linear line can be traced with regards to Egyptian cultural diffusion via art in the ancient Near and Middle East, based on Egyptian foreign campaigns and foreign rulership over Egypt. This lecture will briefly look at various cultures in the Levant, Mesopotamia, and Persia that exhibit examples of royal and divine iconographic influence from Egypt through a variety of art mediums (e.g. cylinder seals, statues, ivories, wall reliefs, etc.). The examples ultimately become a testament the cultural impact Egypt possessed over the ancient Mediterranean world, as most of the art does not demonstrate blind assimilation, but a clear understanding of important Egyptian ideologies that were cleverly modified to fit the context of the culture adopting the iconography.
  • About the Speaker: Chana Algarvio has an MA from the Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations Department in the University of Toronto and is a Master of Information candidate pursing Library & Information Science and Book History. Her research focuses on Egyptian iconography and its influence on the art practices of cultures from the ancient Mediterranean and Middle East, as well as the role of Egyptian book culture in the field of book history. She currently is an intern at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library where she is working on a project dedicated to studying their papyrus collections, in particular reconstructing and examining the iconographic elements from the Ptolemaic cartonnage fragments to acquire a deeper understanding of funerary, religious, and art practices of the Ptolemaic Period.

Summer 2022

Lecture – TBA

  • Who?
  • When? June 2022
  • Where?
  • Registration Link:
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Lecture – TBA

  • Who?
  • When? July 2022
  • Where?
  • Registration Link:
  • Abstract:
  • About the Speaker:

Lecture – TBA

  • Who?
  • When? August 2022
  • Where?
  • Registration Link:
  • Abstract:
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